via gracemcdunnough:

Better User Experience With Storytelling In this article we’ll explore how user experience professionals and designers are using storytelling to create compelling experiences that build human connections.

via gracemcdunnough:

Better User Experience With Storytelling In this article we’ll explore how user experience professionals and designers are using storytelling to create compelling experiences that build human connections.

From Engineering Orientation to Design Orientation
Obi-Wan and Boeing

In his BlogWell Seattle case study presentation, “Obi-Wan and Boeing,” Communications Director, Todd Blecher, spoke about the evolution of Boeing’s online communication approach [the reasoning behind the new Boeing.com].

Todd explained that by focusing on storytelling, sharing, and video, they have been able to change the tone of their online content from technical and boring to personal and interesting.

The Tiger in the WoodsA fable inspired by The Tiger Woods EffectBy Raymond Pirouz
Once upon a time, in a forest kingdom, lived a legendary tiger who wasn’t born legendary, but became a legend over time due to his hard work, impressive performance and acceptance as a leading figure and symbol of accomplishment in the eyes and minds of all who knew of him.
Majestic, self-assured, full of pride, yet private in demeanor, he enjoyed the solitude of the woods while making brief, camouflaged appearances to satisfy the eager curiosity of his adoring fans who couldn’t seem to get enough of him.
One day, as he exposed his face through the shadow of the woods, the tiger stumbled unexpectedly on a hollow log, turning enthusiastic cheers from the gathered crowd into gasps of shock and dismay at the flaw displayed by their living symbol of flawless performance. With a ferocious growl, the tiger disappeared into the dense woods, leaving his fans in a state of disappointed bewilderment.
While the tiger had disappeared, the crowd lingered — expecting and soon demanding an explanation. Absent the tiger, the crowd began to chatter among themselves, theorizing as to why the tiger had stumbled. “Maybe he’s ill,” said the otter. “No, that can’t be — he must have battled the cobra and is suffering a poison wound, surely to die soon,” exclaimed the hawk. “It must be due to my presence…he was intimidated…I don’t blame him,” boasted the lion.
Before long, the forest kingdom was buzzing with theories as to why the tiger was ill, soon to die or just plain cowardly — all of which eventually reached the tiger’s ear. Angry, hurt, embarrassed yet full of pride, the tiger remained stubbornly in his lair, unwilling to face his fans and tell his side of the story. “Maybe I should pick a fight with the cobra, get poisoned and die — it would be easier than having to face them all,” he thought.
Weeks, months and years passed until the legend of the tiger was but a distant memory of the forest kingdom whose inhabitants had moved on to crown the lion as their enduring symbol of achievement and performance.
One day, as a bird flew into a dense bush in search of twigs for its nest, she discovered the skeletal remains of the tiger laying next to a hollow log inside of which the tiger had etched the following statement:

All of the dedication, hard work and time it takes to build a good reputation can be undone in the blink of an eye as a result of fear and stubborn pride. Let this wobbly log tell the story that I so foolishly could not.

The bird alerted the forest kingdom about the existence of the tiger’s skeleton and his etching upon the log. The inhabitants of the forest kingdom were so moved by the tiger’s admitted fallibility (however late in coming) that they erected a memorial to his life and death, pledging to keep his story alive for future generations.
The End

The Tiger in the Woods
A fable inspired by The Tiger Woods Effect
By Raymond Pirouz

Once upon a time, in a forest kingdom, lived a legendary tiger who wasn’t born legendary, but became a legend over time due to his hard work, impressive performance and acceptance as a leading figure and symbol of accomplishment in the eyes and minds of all who knew of him.

Majestic, self-assured, full of pride, yet private in demeanor, he enjoyed the solitude of the woods while making brief, camouflaged appearances to satisfy the eager curiosity of his adoring fans who couldn’t seem to get enough of him.

One day, as he exposed his face through the shadow of the woods, the tiger stumbled unexpectedly on a hollow log, turning enthusiastic cheers from the gathered crowd into gasps of shock and dismay at the flaw displayed by their living symbol of flawless performance. With a ferocious growl, the tiger disappeared into the dense woods, leaving his fans in a state of disappointed bewilderment.

While the tiger had disappeared, the crowd lingered — expecting and soon demanding an explanation. Absent the tiger, the crowd began to chatter among themselves, theorizing as to why the tiger had stumbled. “Maybe he’s ill,” said the otter. “No, that can’t be — he must have battled the cobra and is suffering a poison wound, surely to die soon,” exclaimed the hawk. “It must be due to my presence…he was intimidated…I don’t blame him,” boasted the lion.

Before long, the forest kingdom was buzzing with theories as to why the tiger was ill, soon to die or just plain cowardly — all of which eventually reached the tiger’s ear. Angry, hurt, embarrassed yet full of pride, the tiger remained stubbornly in his lair, unwilling to face his fans and tell his side of the story. “Maybe I should pick a fight with the cobra, get poisoned and die — it would be easier than having to face them all,” he thought.

Weeks, months and years passed until the legend of the tiger was but a distant memory of the forest kingdom whose inhabitants had moved on to crown the lion as their enduring symbol of achievement and performance.

One day, as a bird flew into a dense bush in search of twigs for its nest, she discovered the skeletal remains of the tiger laying next to a hollow log inside of which the tiger had etched the following statement:

All of the dedication, hard work and time it takes to build a good reputation can be undone in the blink of an eye as a result of fear and stubborn pride. Let this wobbly log tell the story that I so foolishly could not.

The bird alerted the forest kingdom about the existence of the tiger’s skeleton and his etching upon the log. The inhabitants of the forest kingdom were so moved by the tiger’s admitted fallibility (however late in coming) that they erected a memorial to his life and death, pledging to keep his story alive for future generations.

The End

The Instructional Value of Storytelling.
If it’s good enough for the Air Force Research Laboratory, Human Effectiveness Directorate, Warfighter Readiness Research Division, it’s good enough for me!

Author’s Note: The information presented in this paper attempts to report from multiple disciplines, highlighting significant thoughts, models, strategies, and research. Much of the language reflects the original context from which it was drawn, i.e. discourse analysis, curriculum studies, adult learning, cognitive science, neuroscience, etc. Limitations of time restrict a more thorough analysis of the situated meaning of language within disciplinary perspectives.
Abstract: Much is known about the value of discourse in the classroom, and the use of stories within an instructional setting. However, little is known about the empirical impact of storytelling on learning, particularly in adult learning settings. This literature review examines theory, models, and research to identify those elements of storytelling that provide pedagogical and andragological value within environments in which adults learn.
Storytelling is form of narrative discourse that contains a triad of equally important components: storyteller, story, and listener. Benjamin (1969) views narrative storytelling as both making (taking personal experience and making it a lived experience for the listener) and doing (in both the telling and listening of the story). It is the performancebased nature of storytelling that differentiates it from other forms of narrative, and situates it appropriately as an instructional device because it provides for knowledge transmission by the storyteller who must be responsive to the recipient if the story is to be successful. Although stories can be planned and scripted, many stories are in the moment unscripted, spontaneous, building upon what is available or needed. Thus storytelling falls into the general category of narrative discourse, where much research can be found.

The Instructional Value of Storytelling.

If it’s good enough for the Air Force Research Laboratory, Human Effectiveness Directorate, Warfighter Readiness Research Division, it’s good enough for me!

Author’s Note: The information presented in this paper attempts to report from multiple disciplines, highlighting significant thoughts, models, strategies, and research. Much of the language reflects the original context from which it was drawn, i.e. discourse analysis, curriculum studies, adult learning, cognitive science, neuroscience, etc. Limitations of time restrict a more thorough analysis of the situated meaning of language within disciplinary perspectives.

Abstract: Much is known about the value of discourse in the classroom, and the use of stories within an instructional setting. However, little is known about the empirical impact of storytelling on learning, particularly in adult learning settings. This literature review examines theory, models, and research to identify those elements of storytelling that provide pedagogical and andragological value within environments in which adults learn.

Storytelling is form of narrative discourse that contains a triad of equally important components: storyteller, story, and listener. Benjamin (1969) views narrative storytelling as both making (taking personal experience and making it a lived experience for the listener) and doing (in both the telling and listening of the story). It is the performancebased nature of storytelling that differentiates it from other forms of narrative, and situates it appropriately as an instructional device because it provides for knowledge transmission by the storyteller who must be responsive to the recipient if the story is to be successful. Although stories can be planned and scripted, many stories are in the moment unscripted, spontaneous, building upon what is available or needed. Thus storytelling falls into the general category of narrative discourse, where much research can be found.

Storytelling Theory and Practice.

Professor Brian Sturm presents storytelling as a way of organizing information, conveying emotions, and building community. A model of storytelling as altered state of consciousness (the story trance) is presented that inlcudes 16 portals to altered states. Three stories are told to illustrate the theoretical model: Truth and Story; What happens when you really listen; and The stone cutter. Storytelling ethics and the need for trust and truth are discussed.

This is a really fantastic talk, including three engaging stories told by the presenter. He does a nice job of merging theory and practice — making the case for why educators, businesses and others can benefit from understanding the art of storytelling.

Professor Sturm’s chapter entitled The Reader’s Altered State of Consciousness — published in The Readers’ Advisor’s Companion By Kenneth D. Shearer & Robert Burgin — also makes for very interesting reading.

Sabri Brothers - Chaap Thilak + English Translation part 2/2.

The symbolic & metaphorical representations in this type of musical/spiritual/mystical storytelling is key. Here is a snapshot of the ancient art of storytelling lost to anyone who would pick up a modern holy book (be it the Bible or what have you) and read it as a literal work.

Sabri Brothers - Chaap Thilak + English Translation part 1/2.

Most delightful Qawwali, with translation — VERY rare stuff. Hope it remains on YouTube for a long time.

Part 2 to follow.

Little Red Riding Hood as Information Motion Graphic Design.

A classic fairy tale creatively retold with the aid of information graphics and motion graphic design — peppered throughout with instances of merchandising.

The intersection of art, science, commerce and fairy tale.

School assignment to reinterpret the
fairytale Little red ridning hood.
Inspired by Röyksopps Remind me.

Music: Slagsmålsklubben, Sponsored by destiny
smk.just.nu
Animation: Tomas Nilsson
tomas-nilsson.se

The Process of-before an IDEA.

This little video does a nice job of telling (one version of) the story behind how we come up with actionable ideas. Creativity is rarely a linear process. You rarely sit down and bang out a masterpiece on your first try. Some can, but for most it’s a process that requires a lot of patience and willingness to look for answers where you may not expect to find them….feeling confident that everything will come together just the way you need it if you are open to all sources of inspiration, and can identify the good ideas and execute on the ones with the most potential.

Jr.canest has several nice videos over at his vimeo profile page — check them out if you are so inclined.

Subprime.

This is a fantastic little video (cool music too) employing very simple yet attractive use of 3D to illustrate an evolution of housing from primitive to modern (love the way they implode to make way for the next generation). It’s making a statement in a subtle and creative way w/o ramming any data down the audience’s throat.